Mashed Potatoes with Boursin Cheese

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I saw this recipe on Rachel Ray the week before Thanksgiving and realized that this needed to be this year’s version of mashed potatoes. Boursin cheese is a soft, creamy, herbed goat cheese that is served in a variety of flavors. (It’s usually found as garlic and herb, but as it was Thanksgiving and that was already chosen, we used Basil and Chive.)

 

I prepped this recipe, having no idea how my family even felt about boursin cheese.  Luckily, I also included a package on my cheese board, and the family ate it up! Yes!

(Note: my cheeseboard used a lot of awesome products from Pasta and Provisions  that I brought down to Florida from Charlotte!)

This is a basic mashed potato recipe, kicked up a notch, so give it a try!

Ingredients:

  • 8-10 medium potatoes, peeled and cubed IMG_5073
  • Salt, divided
  • 1 package Boursin Cheese (or another similar soft, herbed goat cheese)
  • 1-1 1/2 cups warm milk and/or stock
  • 1/4 cup fresh thyme
  • 2 teaspoons lemon zest
  • 2 cloves garlic. minched
  • Pepper, to taste

Directions:

Cover the potatoes with cold water and bring to a boil. Salt the water and cook the potatoes to tender. (Remember that the size of the potato affects the cooking time.) Drain and return to the warm pot to dry them out a bit.

Add to the pot: warm milk and/or stock, boursin/soft cheese, herbs, lemon zest and garlic.

Mash the potatoes with the warm mixture.  (See my nephew, Theo using the ricer here:)

IMG_5079 Adjust salt and pepper.  Serve warm.

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